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May 5 Prayers on the Anniversary of Yad Vashem and the Holocaust

May 3, 2016

MAY 5  Senate of the Colorado General Assembly

Prayer on the Advent of Yad Vashem of our responsibility as citizens toward one another no matter where have come from and where we are in our journey 

Common Ground  OUR  FEET  SET OUT FROM THE FIRST TOWARD a PLACE OF SANCTUARY   WHERE WE COULD FLOURISH  LIFE WAS TENTATIVE PRECARIOUS  STRIFE EXISTED BETWEEN CLANS FORAGING FOR SURVIVAL and WE HUNG IN THE BALANCE ON A FINE THREAD

COMMON GROUND IS OUR LEGACY   WE ENACT THE SAGA ONCE UPON A TIME THAT DELINEATES OUR PASSAGE THROUGH NARROW STRAITS AT EVERY TURN

WE’RE CALLED FROM THE BEGINNING TO NURTURE PRESERVE PERSEVERE WITH HUMILITY AND GRACE TOWARD THE ROCKY SHORES FROM WHICH WE ONCE EMERGED

IF WE’RE TO SURVIVE WE MUST MAKE A LIFE PRESERVER THAt ENCOMPASSES US ALL

 

AMEN

 

 

YAD VASHEM and the anniversary of the Holocaust

What we have lost  –  our humanity  on all sides there is a voracious lack of concern for our neighbors, our brothers, our sisters, our spirits, our connections, our presence as sacred testimony to the light of  one another in each other, we share a common bond that stretches across the horizon from end to end of humanity as one blessing of life giving force forged in our insemination as beings, creative yearning living breathing spirits of an eternal flame.

 

Vad Yashem the WHIRLWID HaShoah for May 5 for the commemoration of the Holocaust before the Senate of the Colorado General Assembly

 

“The word ‘Mayday’ is internationally recognised as an SOS distress signal. The word derived from the French ‘M’aidez’ meaning ‘help me’.

 

It is used to signal a life-threatening emergency by many groups, such as police forces, pilots, firefighters, and transportation organisations. The call is always given three times in a row (“mayday-mayday-mayday”) to prevent mistaking it for some similar-sounding phrase under noisy conditions and to distinguish an actual mayday call from a message about a mayday call.

 

The mayday callsign was originated in 1923 by Frederick Stanley Mockford (1897–1962), a senior radio officer at Croydon Airport in London. He was asked to think of a word that would indicate distress and would easily be understood by all pilots and ground staff in an emergency.  Since much of the traffic at the time was between Croydon and Le Bourget Airport in Paris, he proposed the word ‘mayday’ from the French word ‘m’aidez’.”  Courtesy of http://www.nmmc.co.uk

 

 

And in addition, it is also a multipurpose day for holidays, including:

 

Beltane – the Celtic calendar feast ushering in the start of summer.  Bonfires, often created by rubbing sticks together, were common features of Beltane celebrations. Related rituals included driving cattle between two fires, dancing around the fires, and burning witches in effigy. Another tradition was Beltane cakes, which would be broken into several pieces, one of which was blackened. They would be drawn by celebrants at random; the person getting the unlucky blackened piece would face a mock execution.

 

Walpurgisnacht – St. Walburga (or Walpurgis), the abbess of the monastery of Heidenheim, Germany, helped St. Boniface bring Christianity to 8th Century Germany. She died on Feb. 25, 779. As her remains have been moved on multiple occasions, several days have been designated in her honor, one of which is the first of May. This date coincided with a pre-existing pagan festival, which, in Germany, included rites to protect one against witchcraft. This led to a hybrid legend developing, in which witches were said to meet with the Devil on the eve of May 1, on the Brocken peak. The night of April 30th became known as “Walpurgisnacht,” and the annual meeting was dramatized by Goethe in Faust.

 

Bringing in the May – In medieval England, people would celebrate the start of spring by going out to the country or woods—”going a-maying”—and gathering greenery and flowers, or “bringing in the may.” This was described in “The Court of Love” (often attributed to Chaucer, but not actually written by him) in 1561. Another English tradition is the maypole. Some towns had permanent maypoles that would stay up all year; others put up a new one each May. In any event, the pole would be hung with greenery and ribbons, brightly painted, and otherwise decorated, and served as a central point for the festivities. May Day was also a time for morris dancing and other dances, often around the maypole. In the 19th century, people began to braid the maypole with ribbons by weaving in and out in the course of a dance. Other later traditions include making garlands for children and the crowning of the May Queen.

Labor Day – In many countries, May Day is also Labor Day. This originates with the United States labor movement in the late 19th Century. On May 1, 1886,   unions across the country went on strike, demanding that the standard workday be shortened to eight hours. The organizers of these strikes included socialists, anarchists, and others in organized labor movements. On May 4, there were riots in Haymarket Square in Chicago including a bomb thrown by an anarchist that led to the deaths of a dozen people (including several police officers) and the injury of over 100 more.

The protests were not immediately successful, but they proved effective down the line, as eight-hour work days eventually did become the norm. Labor leaders, socialists, and anarchists around the world took the American strikes and their fallout as a rallying point, choosing May Day as a day for demonstrations, parades, and speeches. It was a major state holiday in the Soviet Union and other communist countries.

 

There were a number of protests around the world and in this country yesterday about labor conditions.  Some things never change…

 

Mayday Parade is also a rock band from Tallahassee and an event used by the Russians to celebrate their victory in WWII and/or Labour Day and/or Orthodox Easter, depending on the calendar…

 

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