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My Father Born September 3 1914 Who Loved Us Without End

September 13, 2016

 

 

My FATHER Frederick Loeb

 

redacted by my sister Terese

I want to correct some of the factual errors in what you wrote — and I want to do this, not to be pedantic, but because if anyone in the younger generations cares, I think it’s important that they know the facts. In four months, I, too, will be 74 and I don’t know how much longer I will live. I want them to know if they care to ask.

Here:

227 Summit Avenue      –      112 Cedar Street in Jenkintown where I was born  I was born in (Abington Hospital)  a mile from where my father was born.  BUT it was here that I first lay my head down to sleep

You were actually born at Abington Hospital. The house where we lived at the time was at 112 Cedar St. It was a semi-detached house, very modest. We lived there until I was 13 years old.

The home had two kitchens one for Kosher and one regular kitchen.

The Summit Avenue house had one kitchen. It was a large kitchen with a big stove. Next to it was a pantry for storing food and dishes, but it was not a kitchen. The family was not kosher and never was. They were Reform Jews.  We were  in Germany
There were porches on every floor and a huge basement. The house was constructed of granite stone.

I believe that the house was constructed of Pennsylvania field stone.  but it was a granite  composite   2 feet thick

Our family were orthodox Jews in Germany but here we were Conservative and eventually Frederick went to temple across the street at Temple Sinai. He did go because I remember him expressing the fact that he was going to  services

It’s true that at least some of the family was Orthodox in Germany. In the United States, they were Reform Jews, as I said above. I never heard dad talk about going to synagogue. Maybe he did, but I never heard him mention it.  Later in his life he was increasingly interested in his religious heritage.  Some of the modern ancestors did continue to attend Conservative Congregations I know because I knew where they attended.  Cheltenham had many diverse sects both affiliated and not.  Most of all we had two training programs for rabbi.  Reconstructionist College and the Reformed College.  I wanted to attend the Reconstructionist College on Church Road but was too poorly prepared to study to be a Rabbi because I always have found that the Rabbinical College was more in keeping with my values.
Everything in the house was maintained by servants who did all of the work, as Granny Terese, dad’s mother never did anything. Rudolph her husband ran a sewing machine factory in Camden making lace curtains with tats.

I wouldn’t call Grandpa Rudy’s factory a “sewing machine factory.” He manufactured curtains and bedspreads, many of which he designed. As you mentioned in what you wrote, he was also an inventor. If you look on the Internet, you will still find the patents for some of the embroidery machines that he invented.
Rudolph died young from the demands of his life escaping pogroms in Germany and coming to Ellis Island by himself as a child.

Grandpa Rudy was 13 years old when he emigrated to the United States. His cousin, Jacob Loeb, was very wealthy and already established in the curtain and bedspread business. Grandpa Rudy worked for his cousin before starting his own business. Grandpa Rudy didn’t come through Ellis Island. That was for poor people. The family was very well off financially and would have sent him here first class.  perhaps they were well to do but the fact that he was sent to escape the ravages of anti-semitism was the most important issue. His life was at risk and they sent him alone.  
Rudolph was 15 when he left his family.  OKAY  13 years of age,

No. See above. He was 13. And, by the way, Grandpa Rudy spelled his name “Rudolf.” Dad’s middle name was Rudolph, as you have spelled it.
Beloved father who taught me how to live and love without end I MISS YOU.

Absolutely, Randle. Beloved father. I miss him, too.

 

My father, Frederick Loeb, was born on this day in 1914. He was born at home in Jenkintown, Pa. in the house in which, 32 years later, his father died. That house remained in our family for 99 years. My cousins sold it a few years ago after their mother’s death. I could still walk through every room, and my father, also, is still with me. I can hear his voice.
Every Nook and cranny that belonged to my family was given away, sold, or returned to the banks.  
We have no sacred haven where we belong  –  a vestige of the  great ancestors who made this life possible. To these people and especially to my father I am always blessed and grateful.
With each passing year I see the ravages of lost hopes, friends, family and yet, we are all blessed beyond measure.
We are all connected it is in the shelter of one another that we all dwell.
227 Summit Avenue  Cedar Street in Jenkintown where I was born a mile from where my father was born. 
The House was a block from the Jenkintown Station when we were small we would go there often to visit cousins and My Father’s younger brother who lived there.
The home had two kitchens one for Kosher and one regular  kitchen.  There were porches on every floor and a huge basement.  The house was constructed of granite stone.  It was mentioned in the Jewish Life of Greater Philadelphia.  Our family  were orthodox Jews in Germany but here we were Conservative and eventually Frederick went to temple across the street.  We attended public schools in Cheltenham moving to 604 Meetinghouse Road, which my mother sold many years after my father died in 1989.  The event of my father’s passing was one of the most traumatic of my life.  We ate breakfast together that final day and I remember kissing him before I left for a speaking engagement,  something I have done for most of my life.  I remember Frederick telling me that “he was afraid to die,”  that fateful day.  He was struggling to breathe as he went up the stairs to his room.  His heart stopped and he died on the stairway.  I remember riding back to the campsite where I was the director and having a message that he had died and was taken to Chestnut Hill Hospital.  He was 74 years old.  He had suffered from emphysema for most of his adult life from cigarettes.  I turned around and went back to Philadelphia from Pottstown.  Nothing ever was the same thereafter in my life. He was my greatest champion even when he did not agree or see fit to accept my arrogant choices.  
No one I have ever met subsequently has ever stood as tall or carried me with such care and love and there never shall be anyone who scarcely breathes who approaches him.  I hold his portrait on my main page as a reminder of who I am and how this person carried  held embraced and loved me without question end and  ever any question of his sacrifice.  He was both mother and father to me as much as he adored tucking me in and being involved in every aspect of my life no matter where I was, he was a mensch.  
Everything in the house was maintained by servants who did all of the work, as Granny Terese, dad’s mother never did anything.  Rudolph her husband ran a sewing machine factory in Camden making lace curtains with tats. Rudolph invented the machinery that made this possible.  Later Frederick’s brother took over this enterprise with his wife.  Rudolph died young from the demands of his life escaping pogroms in Germany and coming to Ellis Island by himself as a child. A cousin picked up Rudolph and took him to Philadelphia when he arrived in New York City at about 1900.
Rudolph was 15 when he left his family.
 
Beloved  father who taught me how to live and love without end  I MISS YOU 

 

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